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Tag: spiral galaxy

Shockwave of an exploding star seen for the first time in sky

Shockwave of an exploding star seen for the first time in sky

galaxies and stars
Shockwave of an exploding star seen for the first time in sky exploding star - Over 75 million light-years away in the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin) lies NGC 4981 a spiral galaxy with a rather explosive past. NGC 4981 was discovered on 17 April 1784 by William Herschel, and subsequently documented in John Dreyer’s New General Catalogue. Over a century later, on 23 April 1968, the galaxy once again made it into the records when a Type la supernova — a stellar explosion in a binary star system — occurred within its confines: SN 1968I. SN 1968I, however, was not to be the galaxy’s only supernova. Decades later, the core collapse of a massive star led to supernova SN 2007c. This spectacular shot of NGC 4981 — not showing any of the supernovae explosions; the bright star visible in t
10 Most different galaxies names images Information and galaxies Facts

10 Most different galaxies names images Information and galaxies Facts

galaxies and stars
The Porpoise Galaxy galaxies Facts   galaxies Fact.s ne look at the Porpoise Galaxy, or NGC 2936, will tell you exactly where the name comes from. It looks just like a dolphin, though some say it looks more like a penguin protecting an egg. In reality, this is a system of two galaxies: The “dolphin” is actually part of NG 2936, while the “egg” is called Arp 142. The dolphin portion used to be a spiral galaxy similar to the Milky Way, but the immense gravitational forces of the denser galaxy below has contorted its shape significantly. The dolphin’s “eye” is what used to be the spiral galaxy’s core. This galaxy is also within the Hydra constellation, and within a billion years or so, the pair will merge into one. For now, we’ll just enjoy the galactic equivalent of a clown making ball
What’s happening to this spiral galaxy?

What’s happening to this spiral galaxy?

galaxies and stars
What's happening to this spiral galaxy?  spiral galaxy Although details remain uncertain, it surely has to do with an ongoing battle with its smaller galactic neighbor. The featured galaxy is labelled UGC 1810 by itself, but together with its collisional partner is known as Arp 273. The overall shape of the UGC 1810 -- in particular its blue outer ring - is likely a result of wild and violent gravitational interactions. This ring's blue color is caused by massive stars that are blue hot and have formed only in the past few million years. The inner galaxy appears older, redder, and threaded with cool filamentary dust. A few bright stars appear well in the foreground, unrelated to UGC 1810, while several galaxies are visible well in the background. Arp 273 lies about 300 million light years
A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy Space Images

A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy Space Images

galaxies and stars
 A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy regardless of its unassuming appearance, the edge on spiral galaxy captured in the left half of of this NASA/ESA Hubble space Telescope photograph is absolutely quite wonderful. Space in Images A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy Located about one billion light-years in the constellation of Eridanus, this placing galaxy known as LO95 0313-192  has a spiral form similar to that of the Milky way. It has a big valuable bulge, and hands speckled with brightly sparkling gas mottled by means of thick traces of dim dirt. Its companion, sitting quite inside the right of the frame, is known as a substitute unpoetically as [LOY2001] J031549.8-190623. Jets! outburst of excellent heat fuel shifting at near the rate of mild have been related to the cores of giant elliptical
Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate

Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate

galaxies and stars
Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate This view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 5584. This galaxy has played a key role in a new study that measures the expansion rate of the Universe to greater accuracy than ever before. NGC 5584 was first spotted as a faint glow in the constellation of Virgo by the great visual observer E. E. Barnard, back in 1881, using just a 12.5-cm telescope. But, by bringing the power of Hubble to bear, the galaxy can be resolved into thousands of separate stars. Some of these stars vary in brightness and are classified as Cepheids. These are brilliant pulsating stars with a remarkable property once the time it takes a Cepheid to brighten and fade is known, then it is possible to find how bright it actu...
dusty spiral galaxy amazing Picture | Hubble Heritage Team

dusty spiral galaxy amazing Picture | Hubble Heritage Team

galaxies and stars
dusty spiral galaxy amazing Picture In 1995, the majestic spiral galaxy NGC 4414 was galaxy pictures, by the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. An international team of astronomers, led by Dr. Wendy Freedman of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, observed this galaxy on 13 different occasions over the course of two months. galaxy pictures were obtained with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) through three different color filters. Based on their discovery and careful brightness measurements of variable stars in NGC 4414, the Key Project astronomers were able to make an accurate determination of the distance to the galaxy. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA/ESA) | dusty spiral galax
ring of brilliant blue star clusters

ring of brilliant blue star clusters

galaxies and stars
The lure of the rings space science news Resembling a diamond-encrusted bracelet, a ring of brilliant blue star clusters wraps around the yellowish nucleus of what was once a normal spiral galaxy in this new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This image is being released to commemorate the 14th anniversary of Hubble's launch on April 24, 1990, and its deployment from the space shuttle Discovery on April 25, 1990. The sparkling blue ring is 150,000 light-years in diameter, making it larger than our entire home galaxy, the Milky Way. The galaxy, catalogued as AM 0644-741, is a member of the class of so- called "ring galaxies." It lies 300 million light-years away in the direction of the southern constellation Dorado. Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage
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