Saturday, May 27Awesome nature

Tag: NASA

What’s happening to this spiral galaxy?

What’s happening to this spiral galaxy?

galaxies and stars
What's happening to this spiral galaxy?  spiral galaxy Although details remain uncertain, it surely has to do with an ongoing battle with its smaller galactic neighbor. The featured galaxy is labelled UGC 1810 by itself, but together with its collisional partner is known as Arp 273. The overall shape of the UGC 1810 -- in particular its blue outer ring - is likely a result of wild and violent gravitational interactions. This ring's blue color is caused by massive stars that are blue hot and have formed only in the past few million years. The inner galaxy appears older, redder, and threaded with cool filamentary dust. A few bright stars appear well in the foreground, unrelated to UGC 1810, while several galaxies are visible well in the background. Arp 273 lies about 300 million light years
Whirlpool Galaxy Images M51 | Messier 51

Whirlpool Galaxy Images M51 | Messier 51

galaxies and stars
Whirlpool Galaxy Images  M51 Whirlpool Galaxy Images M51 Messier 51 Messier  51Messier  51Messier 51 Messier 51 Messier 51  The Whirlpool Galaxy, also known as Messier 51a, M51a, or NGC 5194, is an interacting grand-design spiral galaxy with a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus in the constellation Canes Venatici (the Hunting Dogs). It was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral galaxy. Recently it was estimated to be 23 ± 4 million light-years from our Milky Way galaxy. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) infrared light | Sky Fireworks | galaxy Milky Way | Sky Fireworks Milky Way galaxy | infrared ligh | Awesome Nature |galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cosmic | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling
A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy Space Images

A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy Space Images

galaxies and stars
 A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy regardless of its unassuming appearance, the edge on spiral galaxy captured in the left half of of this NASA/ESA Hubble space Telescope photograph is absolutely quite wonderful. Space in Images A Misbehaving Spiral Galaxy Located about one billion light-years in the constellation of Eridanus, this placing galaxy known as LO95 0313-192  has a spiral form similar to that of the Milky way. It has a big valuable bulge, and hands speckled with brightly sparkling gas mottled by means of thick traces of dim dirt. Its companion, sitting quite inside the right of the frame, is known as a substitute unpoetically as [LOY2001] J031549.8-190623. Jets! outburst of excellent heat fuel shifting at near the rate of mild have been related to the cores of giant elliptical
Star Formation in the tadpole nebula NASA

Star Formation in the tadpole nebula NASA

galaxies and stars
Star Formation in the Tadpole Nebula tadpole nebula NASA. Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation of the Charioteer (Auriga). The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright newly formed cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula. The featured image was taken in infrared light by NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite. Image Credit: WISE, IRSA, NASA; Processing & Copyright: Francisco Antoninus (Tadpole nebula)
Hubble Telescope captures image a galaxy named NGC 7250

Hubble Telescope captures image a galaxy named NGC 7250

galaxies and stars
  In space, being outshone is an occupational hazard. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image captures a galaxy named NGC 7250. Despite being remarkable in its own right '” it has bright bursts of star formation and recorded supernova explosions'” it blends into the background somewhat thanks to the gloriously bright star hogging the limelight next to it. The bright object seen in this Hubble Telescope captures image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy. Only this way can a normal star outshine an entire galaxy, consisting of billions of stars. Astronomers studying distant objects call these stars 'foreground stars' and they are often not very happy ab
Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling | ESA/Hubble

Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling | ESA/Hubble

galaxies and stars
Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling ESA/Hubble Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling | cosmic | infrared light | Milky Way galaxy  | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling  cosmic hair ruffling | ESA/Hubble & NASA From objects as small as Newton's apple to those as large as a galaxy no physical body is free from the stern bonds of gravity, as evidenced in this stunning picture captured by the Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling | ESA/Hubble Here we see two spiral galaxies engaged in a cosmic tug-of-war but in this contest, there will be no winner. The structures of both objects are slowly distorted to resemble new forms, and in some cases, merge together to form new, super galaxies. This parti
LENSED QUASAR

LENSED QUASAR

Nature Updates
LENSED QUASAR Satellite: Hubble Space Telescope Depicts: RXJ1131-1231 Copyright: ESA/Hubble, NASA, Suyu et al. RXJ1131-1231 is among the five best-lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy smears the image of the background quasar into a bright arc (left) and creates a total of four images – three of which can be seen within the arc.                 LENSED QUASAR  | Hubble Space Telescope HE0435-1223 is among the five best-lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy creates four almost evenly distributed images of the distant quasar around it.   Awesome Nature |galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cosmic | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling | Sky Fireworks Galaxy | galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cos
Sunny Side Up

Sunny Side Up

galaxies and stars
Sunny Side Up What may first appear as a sunny side up egg is actually NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's face-on snapshot of the small spiral galaxy NGC 7742. But NGC 7742 is not a run-of-the-mill spiral galaxy. In fact, this spiral is known to be a Seyfert 2 active galaxy, a type of galaxy that is probably powered by a black hole residing in its core. The core of NGC 7742 is the large yellow 'yolk' in the center of the image. The lumpy, thick ring around this core is an area of active star birth. The ring is about 3,000 light-years from the core. Tightly wound spiral arms also are faintly visible. Surrounding the inner ring is a wispy band of material, which is probably the remains of a once very active stellar breeding ground. Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA/ESA) Awesome Natu...
Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate

Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate

galaxies and stars
Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate This view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 5584. This galaxy has played a key role in a new study that measures the expansion rate of the Universe to greater accuracy than ever before. NGC 5584 was first spotted as a faint glow in the constellation of Virgo by the great visual observer E. E. Barnard, back in 1881, using just a 12.5-cm telescope. But, by bringing the power of Hubble to bear, the galaxy can be resolved into thousands of separate stars. Some of these stars vary in brightness and are classified as Cepheids. These are brilliant pulsating stars with a remarkable property once the time it takes a Cepheid to brighten and fade is known, then it is possible to find how bright it actu...
Saturn in Infrared from Cassini | NASA

Saturn in Infrared from Cassini | NASA

Nature Updates
Saturn in Infrared from Cassini Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, SSI.   Explanation: Many details of Saturn appear clearly in infrared light. Bands of clouds show great structure, including long stretching storms. Also quite striking in infrared is the unusual hexagonal cloud pattern surrounding Saturn's the North Pole. Each side of the dark hexagon spans roughly the width of our Earth. The hexagon's existence was not predicted, and its origin and likely stability remain a topic of research. Saturn's famous rings circle the planet and cast shadows below the equator. The featured image was taken by the robotic Cassini spacecraft in 2014 in several infrared colors -- but only processed recently. In September, Cassini's mission will be brought to a dramatic conclusion as the spacecraft
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