Hubble Telescope captures image a galaxy named NGC 7250

  In space, being outshone is an occupational hazard. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image captures a galaxy named NGC 7250. Despite being remarkable in its own right ‘” it has bright bursts of star formation and recorded supernova explosions’” it blends into the background somewhat thanks to the gloriously bright star hogging the limelight next to it. The bright object seen in this Hubble Telescope captures image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy. Only this way can a normal

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Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling | ESA/Hubble

Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling ESA/Hubble Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling | cosmic | infrared light | Milky Way galaxy  | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling  cosmic hair ruffling | ESA/Hubble & NASA From objects as small as Newton’s apple to those as large as a galaxy no physical body is free from the stern bonds of gravity, as evidenced in this stunning picture captured by the Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Galaxy gets a cosmic hair ruffling | ESA/Hubble Here we see two spiral galaxies engaged in a

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LENSED QUASAR

LENSED QUASAR Satellite: Hubble Space Telescope Depicts: RXJ1131-1231 Copyright: ESA/Hubble, NASA, Suyu et al. RXJ1131-1231 is among the five best-lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy smears the image of the background quasar into a bright arc (left) and creates a total of four images – three of which can be seen within the arc.                 LENSED QUASAR  | Hubble Space Telescope HE0435-1223 is among the five best-lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy creates four almost evenly distributed images of the distant quasar around it.   Awesome Nature |galaxy |spiral galaxies |

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