Pacific golden plover | nature magazine

Pacific golden plover The Pacific golden plover (Pluvialis fulva) is a medium-sized plover. The genus name is Latin and means relating to rain, from pluvia, “rain”. It was believed that golden plovers flocked when rain was imminent. The species name fulva is Latin and refers to a tawny color. The 23–26 cm long breeding adult is spotted gold and black on the crown, and back on the wings. Its face and neck are black with a white border, and it has a black breast and a dark rump. The legs are black. In winter, the black is lost and the

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Saturn in Infrared from Cassini | NASA

Saturn in Infrared from Cassini Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, SSI.   Explanation: Many details of Saturn appear clearly in infrared light. Bands of clouds show great structure, including long stretching storms. Also quite striking in infrared is the unusual hexagonal cloud pattern surrounding Saturn’s the North Pole. Each side of the dark hexagon spans roughly the width of our Earth. The hexagon’s existence was not predicted, and its origin and likely stability remain a topic of research. Saturn’s famous rings circle the planet and cast shadows below the equator. The featured image was taken by the robotic Cassini spacecraft in 2014

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Tightly Wound Lenticular galaxy

Tightly Wound Lenticular galaxy Tightly wound, almost concentric, arms of dark dust encircle the bright nucleus of the otherwise nondescript galaxy, NGC 2787, in this image created by the Hubble Heritage team. Astronomer Marcella Carollo (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich) and collaborators used Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to collect the data in January 1999. Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team Awesome Nature |galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cosmic | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling | Sky Fireworks Galaxy | galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cosmic | infrared light | Milky Way galaxy | cosmic galaxy

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The Red Spider Planetary Nebula | The Red Spider Nebula | NASA/ESA, Hubble

Oh what a tangled web a planetary nebula can weave. The Red Spider Planetary Nebula shows the complex structure that can result when a normal star ejects its outer gases and becomes a white dwarf star. Officially tagged NGC 6537, this two-lobed symmetric planetary nebula houses one of the hottest white dwarfs ever observed, probably as part of a binary star system. Internal winds emanating from the central stars, visible in the center, have been measured in excess of 1000 kilometers per second. These winds expand the nebula, flow along the nebula’s walls, and cause waves of hot gas and

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photograph wildflowers

Wildflowers Photography tips and tricks

     Use a tripod   Always use a tripod. I know–tripods are heavy, they take a long time to setup, and can cost a lot of money, but it’s nearly impossible to get sharp wildflowers photographs without one. Nothing keeps your camera more still. Using a tripod will help you get sharper photos by ensuring your camera doesn’t move. But, the tripod helps in another way too: it forces you to be more careful about your composition. Wildflowers Photography When you handhold your camera, there’s a tendency to just snap away, but when you add the tripod, you’ll spend more time

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Galaxies Merging Creates Tails of Star Birth

Not surprisingly, interacting galaxies have a dramatic effect on each other. Studies have revealed that as galaxies approach one another massive amounts of gas are pulled from each galaxy towards the center of the other until ultimately, the two merge into one massive galaxy. NGC 2623 is in the late stages of the merging process, with the centers of the original galaxy pair now merged into one nucleus, but stretching out from the center are two tidal tails of young stars, a strong indicator that a merger has taken place. During such a collision, the dramatic exchange of mass and

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