Saturday, May 27Awesome nature

Month: April 2017

Pictures from space A Cosmic Tadpole

Pictures from space A Cosmic Tadpole

Nature Updates
A Cosmic Tadpole In this new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, a firestorm of star birth is lighting up one end of the diminutive galaxy LEDA 36252 also known as Kiso 5649. The galaxy is a member of a class of galaxies called “tadpoles” because of their bright heads and elongated tails. This galaxy resides relatively nearby, at a distance of 80 million light-years Tadpoles are rare in the local Universe but common in the distant Universe, suggesting that many galaxies pass through a phase like this as they evolve. Credit: NASA, ESA, and D. Elmegreen (Vassar College), B. Elmegreen (IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center), J. Almeida, C. Munoz-Tunon, and M. Filho (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias), J. Mendez-Abreu (University of St. Andrews), J. Gallagher (University of
LENSED QUASAR

LENSED QUASAR

Nature Updates
LENSED QUASAR Satellite: Hubble Space Telescope Depicts: RXJ1131-1231 Copyright: ESA/Hubble, NASA, Suyu et al. RXJ1131-1231 is among the five best-lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy smears the image of the background quasar into a bright arc (left) and creates a total of four images – three of which can be seen within the arc.                 LENSED QUASAR  | Hubble Space Telescope HE0435-1223 is among the five best-lensed quasars discovered to date. The foreground galaxy creates four almost evenly distributed images of the distant quasar around it.   Awesome Nature |galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cosmic | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling | Sky Fireworks Galaxy | galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cos
Sunny Side Up

Sunny Side Up

galaxies and stars
Sunny Side Up What may first appear as a sunny side up egg is actually NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's face-on snapshot of the small spiral galaxy NGC 7742. But NGC 7742 is not a run-of-the-mill spiral galaxy. In fact, this spiral is known to be a Seyfert 2 active galaxy, a type of galaxy that is probably powered by a black hole residing in its core. The core of NGC 7742 is the large yellow 'yolk' in the center of the image. The lumpy, thick ring around this core is an area of active star birth. The ring is about 3,000 light-years from the core. Tightly wound spiral arms also are faintly visible. Surrounding the inner ring is a wispy band of material, which is probably the remains of a once very active stellar breeding ground. Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA/ESA) Awesome Natu...
supercluster Super rich Galactic Cluster

supercluster Super rich Galactic Cluster

galaxies and stars
Super-rich Galactic Cluster This new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the super-rich galaxy cluster Abell 1413. Located between the constellations of Leo (The Lion) and Coma Berenices, the cluster is over 2 billion light-years from Earth. This image is dominated by a large and highly elliptical galaxy called MCG+04-28-097, with a halo of stars extending for more than 6.5 million light-years. Abell 1413 is part of the Abell catalog, a collection of over 4000 rich clusters of galaxies fairly close to Earth — at least from a cosmological perspective — their light took less than 3 billion years to reach us. The clusters are called rich due to the huge number of galaxies they contain. Abell 1413 is observed to contain more than 300 galaxies held together by the immense g
Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate

Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate

galaxies and stars
Spiral Galaxy a Key to the universe expansion rate This view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 5584. This galaxy has played a key role in a new study that measures the expansion rate of the Universe to greater accuracy than ever before. NGC 5584 was first spotted as a faint glow in the constellation of Virgo by the great visual observer E. E. Barnard, back in 1881, using just a 12.5-cm telescope. But, by bringing the power of Hubble to bear, the galaxy can be resolved into thousands of separate stars. Some of these stars vary in brightness and are classified as Cepheids. These are brilliant pulsating stars with a remarkable property once the time it takes a Cepheid to brighten and fade is known, then it is possible to find how bright it actu...
Composite ultraviolet visible infrared photography

Composite ultraviolet visible infrared photography

galaxies and stars
    Composite ultraviolet visible infrared photography This infrared photography is a multi-wavelength composite made by seven individual exposures made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. These exposures were taken by the Faint Object Camera (FOC), Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This image is issued jointly by NASA and ESA. Credit: NASA, ESA, Dan Maoz (Tel-Aviv University, Israel, and Columbia University, USA) The Red Spider Planetary Nebula | Awesome Nature | galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cosmic | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling | Sky Fireworks Galaxy | galaxy |spiral galaxies | NASA/ESA | cosmic | infrared light | Milky Way galaxy | cosmic galaxy hair ruffling | Hubble Space Tele
One of the Most Beautiful Galaxies in Our Skies

One of the Most Beautiful Galaxies in Our Skies

galaxies and stars
very interesting facts about Beautiful Galaxy The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes some of the most beautiful galaxies in our skies spirals sparkling with bright stellar nurseries (heic1403), violent duos ripping gas and stars away from one another as they tangle together (heic1311), and ethereal irregular galaxies that hang like flocks of birds suspended in the blackness of space (heic1114, heic1207). Most Beautiful Galaxies in Our Skies However, galaxies, like humans, are not all supermodels. This little spiral, known as NGC 4102, has a different kind of appeal, with its tightly wound spiral arms and understated, but charming, appearance. NGC 4102 lies in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (The Great Bear). It contains what is known as a LINER, or low-ioni
Galaxy with a Bad Hair Day

Galaxy with a Bad Hair Day

galaxies and stars, Nature Updates
Galaxy with a 'Bad Hair Day Galaxy with a Bad Hair Not all galaxies are neatly shaped, as this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of NGC 6240 clearly demonstrates. Hubble previously released an image of this galaxy back in 2008, but the knotted region, shown here in a pinky-red hue at the centre of the galaxies, was only revealed in these observations from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. NGC 6240 lies 400 million light-years away in the constellation of Ophiuchus (The Serpent Holder). This galaxy has an elongated shape with branching wisps, loops and tails. This mess of gas, dust and stars bears more than a passing resemblance to a butterfly and, though perhaps less conventionally beautiful, a lobster. This bizarrely-shaped galaxy did not begin i
Pacific golden plover | nature magazine

Pacific golden plover | nature magazine

Nature Updates
Pacific golden plover The Pacific golden plover (Pluvialis fulva) is a medium-sized plover. The genus name is Latin and means relating to rain, from pluvia, "rain". It was believed that golden plovers flocked when rain was imminent. The species name fulva is Latin and refers to a tawny color. The 23–26 cm long breeding adult is spotted gold and black on the crown, and back on the wings. Its face and neck are black with a white border, and it has a black breast and a dark rump. The legs are black. In winter, the black is lost and the plover then has a yellowish face and breast, and white underparts. It is similar to two other golden plovers: the Eurasian and American plovers. The Pacific golden plover is smaller, slimmer and relatively longer-legged than the European golden plover, Plu
Saturn in Infrared from Cassini | NASA

Saturn in Infrared from Cassini | NASA

Nature Updates
Saturn in Infrared from Cassini Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, SSI.   Explanation: Many details of Saturn appear clearly in infrared light. Bands of clouds show great structure, including long stretching storms. Also quite striking in infrared is the unusual hexagonal cloud pattern surrounding Saturn's the North Pole. Each side of the dark hexagon spans roughly the width of our Earth. The hexagon's existence was not predicted, and its origin and likely stability remain a topic of research. Saturn's famous rings circle the planet and cast shadows below the equator. The featured image was taken by the robotic Cassini spacecraft in 2014 in several infrared colors -- but only processed recently. In September, Cassini's mission will be brought to a dramatic conclusion as the spacecraft
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